Introduction

Born Chloe Anthony Wofford, in 1931 in Lorain, Ohio, as the second of child of four children in a black working-class family, Morrison displayed an early interest in literature.

Toni Morrison's novels examine the black community in Ohio, the state she has known since her youth, at various stages of its history. Her passionate and poetic writing particularly address the impact that slavery had and continues to have on people who struggle to retain their dignity.

In 1993, Toni Morrison became the first black woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Payne, Tom. The A-Z of Great Writers. London: Carlton, 1997, 258

"Freeing yourself was one thing, claiming ownership of that freed self was another"

Toni Morrison, Beloved

Library resources

On our shelves:

Fiction:

Collections:

  • Toni Morrison. Women of words: a personal introduction to thirty-five important writers, edited by Janet Bukovinsky. Philadelphia: Running Press, 1994. 165-169.

Criticism and interpretation:

  • Wood, Michael. "Toni Morrison." Children of silence: studies in contemporary fiction. London: Pimlico, 1998. 119-127.

eReserve


Study notes

On our shelves:

Online:

  • Toni Morrison - GradeSaver - Biography and links to study guides for her novels

Beloved:

The Bluest eye:

Tar baby:


Interviews

  • Brockes, Emma. "Toni Morrison: 'I want to feel what I feel. Even if it's not happiness'." The Guardian. 14 April, 2012. Internet. 19 January 2017.
  • Gross, Terry. "I regret everything: Toni Morrison looks back on her personal life." NPR Books. 24 August, 2015. Internet. 19 January 2017.
  • Hoby, Hermione. "Toni Morrison: 'I'm writing for black people ... I don't have to apologise'." The Guardian. 25 April, 2015. Internet. 19 January 2017.
  • Schappell, Elissa. and Claude Brodsky Lacour. "Toni Morrison." Paris Review. issue 128, Fall 1993. Internet. 19 January 2017.

Reviews


Web resources:

General:

Criticism and interpretation:

Essay:

  • Morrison, Toni. "Making American White again: the choices made by white men, who are prepared to abandon their humanity out of fear of black men and women, suggest the true horror of lost status." The New Yorker - Dispatches. 21 November 2016. Internet. 19 January 2017.